The Utility of High-Intensity, Intermittent Exercise Protocols to Induce Fatigue for Screening Purposes in Jump-Landing Sports
(Stefan Vermeulen, Camilla De Bleecker, Valentien Spanhove, Jan Boone, Tine Willems, Jos Vanrenterghem, Philip Roosen, Roel De Ridder)

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Authors
Stefan Vermeulen, Camilla De Bleecker, Valentien Spanhove, Jan Boone, Tine Willems, Jos Vanrenterghem, Philip Roosen, Roel De Ridder
Abstract

Short-term fatigue protocols simulating sports participation are scarce and not well-documented in jump-landing sports. Therefore, this study investigated physiological and physical responses following high-intensity, intermittent exercise protocols (HIIPs) with a standardized level of subjective exhaustion (Borg ≥18/20) and a modified fixed version of five circuits (HIIP-5) for future inclusion in biomechanical screening protocols. Twenty male volleyball and basketball players participated in this study to complete the HIIP and the HIIP-5. Physiological and physical variables were assessed before and up to 30 min after cessation of both protocols. Regarding physiological variables, heart rate values increased (+104 bpm, p < 0.001) and remained elevated up to 30 min (+34 bpm, p < 0.001), and blood lactate levels increased (+17 mmol/l, p < 0.001) compared to baseline. Regarding physical variables, decreased jump height (−4 cm, p = 0.001–0.009) and quadriceps muscle strength (p = 0.001−0.050) were observed up to 30 min compared to baseline. The type of the fatigue protocol did not have an effect on the investigated variables (p > 0.05). To conclude, both the HIIP and the HIIP-5 seem valuable tools to induce acute and long-lasting responses, providing a sufficiently large time window of 30 min within which biomechanical markers of injury can be assessed under fatigued conditions in future risk factor screenings. In practice, the fatigue protocol can be terminated after only five circuits if athletes had not yet been stopped at that point due to exhaustion (Borg ≥18/20).
DOI
DOI: 10.5114/jhk/183537
Citation
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Key words
recovery, isokinetic dynamometry, physiology, performance, exertion,

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